The results after 1 week Duck Duck Go: I’m switching back to Google.

WARNING: This post was originally published in 2011 and hasn't been updated since.
The tips, techniques and technology explained here may be outdated. If you spot any errors, please let me know in the comments so I can adjust the article. Thanks!

I thought it would be a fun experiment to try out Duck Duck Go instead of Google for one week. It seemed reasonable, to avoid that filter bubble and avoid the tracking that Google does to you.

It's been more than a month ago that I said I would test it, but I must admit I lost track of it after one day. I need "my Google" to find solutions that I couldn't find on Duck Duck Go. And while the idea of Duck Duck Go is pretty neat, it just doesn't cut it when I'm trying to decypher deep technical problems.

In the end, it's as simple as this: I need Google and Google needs me. I accept their ads and their tracking, they help me get my job done. If that means I need to sacrifice part of my (online) privacy, then I guess I'll just have to settle.

So Long And Thanks For All The Ducks!

5 comments on “The results after 1 week Duck Duck Go: I’m switching back to Google.
  1. Ronny says:

    Who owns DuckDuckGo? Where do your search queries go? How do we know what they do with your data? Who is behind this? Where do they get their money from?

    Now give Yacy a try for a week, I would like to read about that.

  2. Philip Paeps says:

    That’s pretty weak. You need Google to decipher problems? Why don’t you read the source code? How do you work when you’re on a plane or otherwise without connection to the internet? This dependency on the “web” really can’t be healthy.

    For what it’s worth: I’ve been using DuckDuckGo for over a year now and haven’t looked back. No plans to look back either.

    I don’t accept your conclusion. Nobody should have to rely on Google (or any other privacy invading institution) to get their job done. Once that starts being true, the world will be in a really fucked up state.

  3. Matti says:

    You need Google to decipher problems? Why don’t you read the source code?

    I don’t *need* Google, but it sure as hell helps. Reading source code isn’t an option with proprietary software (unfortunately, not everything is open source – despire our efforts). I’m sure DuckDuckGo can find everything Google can (I think in the end they use Google to find the results as well), but having my search results tailored to my specific needs and history just helps me find what I need -much- faster.

    Nobody should have to rely on Google (or any other privacy invading institution) to get their job done. Once that starts being true, the world will be in a really fucked up state.

    True: but I would gladly give up part of my privacy if it means I can be more effective at what I do. If DuckDuckGo forces me to go through 5+ pages of search results before I find what I need, and Google can show it to me on the first page, I’ll be using Google.

  4. Sinisa says:

    Ok , you go back to Google if it fits your needs.
    I have opposite experience: DuckDuckGo shows faster what I want to know, Google shows faster what I want to buy.
    And I don’t buy much over the Internet. Especially avoid aggressively advertised stuff.
    I discovered DuckDuckGo last year and use both.
    I miss good old Alta Vista. Now it is owned by Yahoo and not as good as it was.
    (I don’t say that Yahoo is the reason. After all these years Alta Vista probably has another people to work there, regardless the ownership.)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Advertisement

Why ads?

I'm glad you made it to this blogpost. I hope it helps solve your problem. So why then do I show ads on the site? Writing content, testing it and making sure the layout isn't totally b0rked takes time. A lot of time. The ads are a way to pay back a small portion of that time.

And as you know running a site costs (a bit of) money: the domain name, webhosting, time spent writing and updating content, ... So if you like the content of this blog, consider disabling your AdBlocker for this domain. Thanks!

Looking for help?

Tired of fixing all these tech-problems yourself? We've got an excellent team at Nucleus, a top-class Belgian hosting provider, that can help you.

Discover our Managed Hosting, where skilled engineers manage your servers and keep them up-to-date, so you can focus on your core business. We use a variety of Configuration Management Systems such as Puppet to make sure every config is reviewed, unit-tested and guaranteed to be working.

Want to get in touch? Find me as @mattiasgeniar on Twitter or via the contact-page on this blog.